Matt Denn announced his plans to run for the Democratic nomination for Delaware attorney general in this November's election via Twitter. 

The political whirlwind set off Thursday when Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden surprisingly announced that he would not run for another term as AG this November. That announcement has now blown Matt Denn into a run for AG's office. 

"My friend Beau Biden surprised all of Delaware, including me, by announcing that he would end his bid for reelection," Denn said in a statement on Biden's plans to run for governor in 2016. That surprising decision led many people to wonder, if Biden's not running on the Democratic side for attorney general, who will?

The answer: Lt. Gov. Denn. "It has been a busy few days since then, with many people urging me to consider becoming a candidate for attorney general this year." In those few days, Denn made up his mind to vie for the AG's office. 

"I’ve realized that the attorney general’s office would allow me to take a leadership role on some issues that are critical to our state, while still staying involved in the issues involving Delaware’s children that have been the core of my work over the last six years," Denn said. 

While Beau Biden has avoided interviews and announced his campaign via statements emailed to the press, Denn planned to talk with reporters and take questions on the day he announced. In an interview with WHYY on Monday morning, Denn said he will take a few weeks to solidify what he wants to accomplish as attorney general before rolling out his campaign in full force.

"If you want to run for office, then it's your responsibility to get out and talk to people about why you'd be the best candidate, and I'm going to do that," he said.

Denn said he would remain in the lieutenant governor's office while campaigning for AG. If he were to win and become attorney general, there is no provision in the Delaware code for the lieutenant governor to be replaced, which means Delaware could have no lieutenant governor until the 2016 election. However, if he loses, he will remain the state's second-in-command. Either way, it's an issue Denn said will likely be addressed by the General Assembly.