A new report highlights the importance of wetlands, and warns of the dangers of letting Delaware's  disappear.

Much like the Dr. Seuss hero the Lorax, who spoke for the trees, a new report from Environment America aims to speak for the wetlands.

"Our wetlands are nature's first line of defense against storms and flooding," said Environment America's Kimberly Williams. "We need to protect what’s left of them."

According to the Environment America report, "Shelter from the Storm," the existing wetlands in Delaware are able to hold enough rain water to cover the entire city of Wilmington in more than a foot and a half of water.

The report also calls for more safeguards to protect wetlands. "We’re advocating for infrastructure to protect clean water," said the Delaware Nature Society's Brian Winslow. Things like sewers and storm water, but our best line of defense is nature’s defense, which are wetlands." 

Williams and Winslow spoke at the DuPont Environmental Education Center along the Wilmington Riverfront. They were joined by Wilmington City Council member Hanifa Shabazz, who grew up in the city's Southbridge section, which is especially prone to flooding. 

"We are committed to preserving the nearby wetlands and to  mitigating the flooding that affects Southbridge and other areas of Wilmington," Shabazz said. "We've got to take all steps necessary to make it a prime area for economic and workforce development projects."