Philadelphia's mandatory sick time bill and reforms to the DROP early retirement incentive program have been approved by City Council. But will Mayor Nutter sign off on them?

The bill requiring most employers to give their workers paid sick time was approved by a 9-to-8 margin. The mayor's press secretary Mark McDonald wouldn't commit to a veto, but it appears the mayor's pointing that way.

"The Nutter Administration applauds the notion of developing legislation somewhere and at some level to deal with the issue of sick leave. We do believe that it is best done at the state or federal level," said McDonald.

Political consultant Jeff Jubelirer said after losses on a proposed soda tax, DROP and sick leave, the mayor is running low on political capital.

"Sick time may not come to fruition because they can't override a veto without two thirds of the vote in City Council," said Jubelirer.

The mayor's spokesman was not as coy about the DROP bill, saying the Nutter administration would re-introduce legislation eliminating the program once a roster of new Council members takes office in January.

The bill that passed Council by a 14-3 vote Thursday reduced the costs of the program by tweaking some rules, but did not address the factor that became a flashpoint for public anger at DROP: elected officials taking advantage of the benefit.