Vice President Joe Biden has donated his Senate papers to his alma mater, the University of Delaware.

During a visit to the Newark campus Friday, the longtime Democratic senator contributed records of his legislative career to be added to UD's special collections holdings.

Biden shared with a packed auditorium what he hoped future scholars and historians would derive from his body of work in the Senate.

"One, they will not regale in the fact that I do not know how to spell." On a serious note, Biden continued, "I hope what they'll take away from my papers is a deeper understanding of how true and honest compromise can advance the great national goals."

Biden, a 1965 graduate of the university, also delivered the inaugural speech in a lecture series honoring the late professor James R. Soles.

During his 55-minute address, Biden gave an oral account of his 36 years in the Senate, recalling key moments, heroes, and mentors. He also reflected on his motivation for getting into -- and staying in – politics; personal tragedy; the "Delaware Way"; his keys to success; and the main topic of his speech: the Constitution.

"The greatness of our Constitution is the promise that every single voice can be heard," he said. "Because our government processes are designed to blend these voices together, perhaps not always in harmony, but ultimately in unity."

And in light of the political divisiveness in Washington, DC, and the overall poor public opinion of Congress, Biden defended his chosen profession.

"Politics is not a dirty word. At the end of the day politics is the only way a community can govern itself and realize its goals without the sword."

To hear part of Biden's address select the audio attachment at the top of this story.