New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says he's disappointed with the outcome of the presidential election.

The Republican governor says he put a lot of time and effort into the Mitt Romney campaign and expected it would take longer to declare a winner.

 

The governor's recent rounds of praise for President Barack Obama's quick response to the emergency situation of Superstorm Sandy was interpreted by some as a rebuff of Romney -- and a way of paving a presidential path for himself.

Christie says he's not thinking now about whether he'll run for president in four years because he's focused on dealing with all the problems caused by the storms.

"When this stuff is going on you have a job to do. People have given you a job, the most important job in this state in my opinion. That's what I'm focused on," he said during a tour of Long Beach Island Wednesday to check on preparations for the nor'easter bearing down on the coast.

"I'm honored to be the governor of New Jersey. Any other honors that come in my life, if they come, they come in due course," Christie said. "I can guarantee you one thing. I'm not thinking about it today."

The governor also said he was satisfied with the emergency measures that allowed New Jersey residents who were displaced by Sandy to vote.

"I thought the reports of problems were scattered and anecdotal," he said.

Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno was dealing with problems as they came up along with county election officials," Christie said.

" We're going to do an after-action report internally to see how it went and what changes we need to make, but I hope we'll never have to deal with something like this again," he said.

State elections officials say it might take until next week to come up with the number of residents who used provisional ballots at polling places other than their usual one or voted by email or fax.