The little remaining snow didn’t add much to the already picturesque scenery at Rittenhouse Square on Saturday. It seemed to make the place look grittier than it does on a nice summer day.

But this didn’t bother about forty dancers and photographers, who came out for a creative collaboration in this urban landscape, and later went underground, literally.

The meet-up was organized by dancer and choreographer Jacob Jonas, who has organized similar events in New York and in his hometown, Los Angeles.

When you start collaborating with different art forms different points of view become clearer to those participating, said Jonas. It is cool, he said, because everyone has his own unique perspective.

Jonas said he was was inspired by New York Instagrammer Dave Krugman. He hopes to pull more creative people together with similar events in other cities.

Saturday's gathering snowballed after a message a day earlier by Instagrammer Christopher Robinson. That call for artists quickly gained popularity and hundreds liked and commented. Robinson’s followers were immediately triggered and interested in participating.

And so it happened Saturday afternoon. Despite temperatures around forty degrees, an equal mix of shooters and dancers came to Rittenhouse Square to make art together.

Smart phone in one hand, his camera in the other, Instagrammer Albert Lee took in the photographic opportunities around him.

The photographer is a moodsetter, he explained. Shooting willing models, especially graceful dancers, is a welcome change for photographers that are so used to cityscapes, without people as the main subject, said Lee.

People passing through Rittenhouse Square turned their heads and stopped to see art in the making, Lee noted.